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Introducing the Vegetable of the Week: Green Beans

The Vegetable of the Week is Green Beans so check our Facebook Page and Blog for interesting daily facts and weekly recipes.

Michael Madfis is an experienced agricultural farmer.  With the success of his two farms, Fort Lauderdale Vegetables and Flagler Village, Mr. Madfis has been able to provide the community of Fort Lauderdale with fresh produce since 2009.  To learn more, contact him at farmfortlauderdaleschool.com or via email at farmfortlauderdalespringbreak@gmail.com.

Introducing the Vegetable of the Week: Potatoes

The Vegetable of the Week is Potatoes so check our Facebook Page and Blog for interesting daily facts and weekly recipes.

Michael Madfis is an experienced agricultural farmer.  With the success of his two farms, Fort Lauderdale Vegetables and Flagler Village, Mr. Madfis has been able to provide the community of Fort Lauderdale with fresh produce since 2009.  To learn more, contact him at farmfortlauderdaleschool.com or via email at farmfortlauderdalespringbreak@gmail.com.

Happy Thanksgiving from Farm Fort Lauderdale

Happy Thanksgiving Fort Lauderdale

Here at Farm Fort Lauderdale we wish you all a Happy Thanksgiving.

5 Steps to Growing Tomatoes in a Micro Farm

Urban farm tomatoA micro farm is perfect for urban settings, as the size and minimal maintenance fit perfect within the culture of that community.  Tomatoes, a garden and farm staple, is a great vegetable to start off with, as the growing process is relatively simple and there are many recipes you can make with tomatoes, thus making it a convenient item to grow as well.  Fort Lauderdale Vegetables, is an urban micro farm known for providing fresh, healthy vegetables, fruits, and eggs to the Fort Lauderdale and Broward Community.  Below are a few tips to grow fresh, healthy tomatoes.

Tip #1: Location, Location, Location: It is well known that a nice sunny area is ideal for growing all vegetables, so choosing an area that allows the vegetables to be fully exposed to the sun and big enough for extra planting (usually done about three works from the first week of the original planting).  Additionally it’s best to allow 24 inches between each plant and to make sure the rows are at least three feet apart, this helps greatly with air circulation.  Moreover, ensure that the soil is tested, as tomatoes thrive best in a mid-range soil pH of around 7.  There are many easy to use soil sampling kits and they are available at the local cooperative extension office.

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